Water Quality

Health Information About Water Quality

Infants and young children are typically more vulnerable to lead in drinking water than the general population. It is possible that lead levels at your home may be higher than other homes in the community as a result of materials used in your home’s plumbing. If you are concerned about elevated lead levels in your home’s water, you may wish to have your water tested and flush your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using tap water. Additional information is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800) 426-4791.

Detected Contaminants

SNAKE RIVER WD routinely monitors for contaminants in your drinking water according to Federal and State laws. The following table(s) show all detections found in the period of January 1 to December 31, 2012 unless otherwise noted. The State of Colorado requires us to monitor for certain contaminants less than once per year because the concentrations of these contaminants are not expected to vary significantly from year to year, or the system is not considered vulnerable to this type of contamination. Therefore, some of our data, though representative, may be more than one year old. The “Range” column in the table(s) below will show a single value for those contaminants that were sampled only once. Violations, if any, are reported in the next section of this report.

Note: Only detected contaminants appear in the report. If no tables appear in this section, that means that SNAKE RIVER WD did not detect any contaminants in the last round of monitoring.

Organics and Inorganics Year Avg Value Range # of Samples Unit MCL MCLG Typical Source
BARIUM 2011 0.027 0.022-0.032 2 ppm 2 2 Discharge of drilling wastes
Discharge from metal refineries
Erosion of natural deposits
NITRATE (AS N) 2013 0.18 0.15-0.2 2 ppm 10 10 Runoff from fertilizer use
Leaching from septic tanks, sewage
Erosion of natural deposits
HEXACHLORO-BENZENE 2012 0.002 0-0.008 4 ppm 1 Discharge from metal refineries and agricultural chemical factories

 

Lead and Copper Monitoring Period 90th Percentile # of Samples Unit Sample Sites Above Action Level Action Level Typical Source
COPPER 06/01/2013 to 09/30/2013 0.755 10 ppm 0 1.3 Corrosion of household plumbing systems. Erosion of natural deposits.
LEAD 06/01/2013 to 09/30/2013 3.9 10 ppb 0 15 Corrosion of household plumbing systems. Erosion of natural deposits.

 

Disinfection Byproducts Year Avg Value Range # of Samples Unit MCL MCLG Typical Source
Total Trihalomethanes 2012 1.25 0-2.5 2 ppb 80 N/A Byproduct of drinking water disinfection
Total Haloacetic Acids 2012 0.5 0-1.0 2 ppb 60 N/A Byproduct of drinking water disinfection

 

Radionuclides Year Avg of Individual Samples Range of Individual Samples # of Samples Unit MCL MCLG Typical Source
Combined Radium (-226 & -228) 2011 0.92 0.09-0.94 2 pCi/L 5 0 Erosion of natural deposits
Combined Uranium 2011 0.4 0-0.8 2 ppb 30 0 Erosion of natural deposits
Gross Alpha, Excl Radon & Uranium 2011 1.06 0.96-1.1 2 pCi/L 15 0 Erosion of natural deposits
Gross Beta Particle Activity 2011 2 2-2 2 pCi/L 50 0 Erosion of natural & manmade deposits

 

Secondary Contaminants / Other Monitoring Year Avg of Individual Samples Range of Individual Samples # of Samples Unit Secondary Standard
SODIUM 2011 7.75 7.6-7.9 2 ppm 10000

Secondary standards are non-enforceable guidelines for contaminants that may cause cosmetic effects (such as skin or tooth discoloration) or aesthetic effects (such as taste, odor or color) in drinking water. EPA recommends these standards but does not require water systems to comply.